You’ve got to have flex appeal!

20Jun 17

Becoming a parent is one of the most life-changing events and person can encounter. Alongside the heady love that runs so deep it almost knocks you sideways and the unrivalled joy of watching a small human (that you created) grow into a person, comes a set of life-changes and logistical challenges that can, at times, feel extremely hard to navigate. And for parents who choose to pursue a career alongside their roles as Head of Pram Operations/Snot Wiping Manager/Chief Nappy Officer, these challenges can be debilitating.

At the core of most issues that working parents face is time. Whether their kids are in childcare, school or at home, meeting their ever-changing needs can make it extremely difficult to simultaneously keep up with the responsibilities and time-demands of a job. Full time parents may only be able to work when their kids are in bed (for many this means before 7am and after 8pm), school holidays may be causing a logistical nightmare or it may be that the only available nursery requires a 3pm pick-up.
 
Inflexible work set-ups combined with the cost of childcare have left parents in a range of impossible situations: having to give up a career they spent their whole adult lives building, working full time to take home a mere £14/day once childcare is paid for or only seeing their children on the weekend.

Something has to give.

If there is one thing a working parent needs (aside from an unbroken night’s sleep!) it is flexibility; having greater control over when and where they work can be a lifeline that makes their career a viable possibility. This could involve working a 4-day week, working from home or working outside the traditional 9am-6pm hours.

Whatever form flexible working takes, the first step towards making it possible is a shift in perspective. Flexible working has for a long time been seen as synonymous with a reduction in productivity when, in reality, the opposite is true. Employers fear relinquishing control and that flex initiatives might ‘open up a can of worms’ that sees their whole team coming in and out of the office as they wish. But putting some simple measures in place will ensure that both employee and employer will reap the numerous rewards that flexible working can bring:

 ‘The 3 C’s’: Top Tips for Making it Work

1. Clarity – employees must be open and clear about the challenges they are facing and what practical steps would alleviate some pressure.

2. Consistency – create a plan and stick to it – this way both employer and employee know what to expect and can plan accordingly.

3. Communication – keep an open dialogue about what’s working and what isn’t – don’t be afraid to make changes where necessary.

To find out more about regulations and guidelines around flexible working, the following resources may come in handy:

Timewise: http://timewise.co.uk/

Working Families: https://www.workingfamilies.org.uk/articles/flexible-working-after-30th-july-2014-a-guide-for-employees/

The TUC: https://www.tuc.org.uk/flexible-working-parents

CFO Innovation: https://www.cfoinnovation.com/white-paper/7527/flexible-road-workforce-productivity

Mother Pukka’s guide to requesting flexible working: http://motherpukka.co.uk/blog/get-flexible-working

Workplace mental health and wellbeing: at a tipping point?

11Jun 17

With greater public awareness, political interest and transparency around the importance of good workplace mental health and wellbeing, more and more employers are reviewing their activities in this space. Yet despite this positive trend, many employers are still facing numerous challenges in implementing effective mental health and wellbeing strategies.

New research from the Deloitte Centre for Health Solutions places workplace mental health and wellbeing at a tipping point, with employers increasingly reviewing their activities in supporting employee mental health and wellbeing. Recognising the costs of poor mental health and wellbeing on today’s workforce, the report is designed as a call to action for employers, whatever their current performance regarding mental health and wellbeing strategies.

 

Key findings

  • Progress towards greater awareness and recognition of mental health is occurring at a slower rate in the workplace, compared to conversations occurring in public spaces more generally
  • Costs associated with poor mental health and wellbeing result from absence costs, from presenteeism and turnover costs, as well as from staff that is not fully enthusiastic and engaged due to low mental wellbeing
  • Greater public awareness, increasing political attention and an increased emphasis on employer responsibilities are driving an increased interest in workplace mental health and wellbeing.

 

Five key implementation challenges for employers

  • Failure to see mental health and wellbeing as a priority
  • Mental health and wellbeing policies are reactive and driven by staff events or experience
  • Lack of insight around current performance
  • Poor evidence base to measure return on investment of wellbeing strategies
  • Lack of collective knowledge around best practice.

 

Key actions for employers

  • Get workplace mental health and wellbeing on the agenda
  • Take stock and monitor performance
  • Create buy-in for the case for change and investment
  • Implement key initiatives adapted for specific workforce challenges and demographics
  • Evaluate programmes and communicate successes
  • Encourage employees to support colleagues.

Article published on www.deloitte.com in March 2017.

For original article and link to download the report, click here.